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The World's Open Report on Jobs.

 

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Expand 01. What is a “Good" Job?01. What is a “Good" Job?
Expand 02. Job Strategy or Growth Strategy, Which Should Come First?02. Job Strategy or Growth Strategy, Which Should Come First?
Expand 03. How to Tackle Youth Unemployment?03. How to Tackle Youth Unemployment?
Expand 04. Should Jobs Good for Development be Targeted?04. Should Jobs Good for Development be Targeted?
Expand 05. Building Skills, Which and How?05. Building Skills, Which and How?
Expand 06. How Can Entrepreneurship be Fostered?06. How Can Entrepreneurship be Fostered?
Expand 07. How Can Economies Move From Low to High Productivity Jobs?07. How Can Economies Move From Low to High Productivity Jobs?
Expand 08. How Can Job Policies Improve Social Cohesion?08. How Can Job Policies Improve Social Cohesion?
Expand 09. Should Policies Protect People or Jobs?09. Should Policies Protect People or Jobs?
Expand 10. Is Global Job Competition Here to Stay?10. Is Global Job Competition Here to Stay?
Expand 11. Should Policy Makers Embrace Informality?11. Should Policy Makers Embrace Informality?
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Last modified at 2/4/2013 12:09 PM by JKP Admin

​Is the global competition over jobs here to stay?
Globalization has strengthened the international division of labor and created new jobs at an unprecedented rate. It has also led to systemic shifts that are now affecting entire sectors of the economy.
Over the last two decades, we saw the migration of blue-collar manufacturing jobs in the wake of international trade deals that widened the export market for China and developing nations. In more recent years, we have also seen the trade in services grow through outsourcing and new technology, affecting workers in sometimes highly paid occupations.
We should identify cooperative policies and arrangements at the global or regional level to reduce the perceived competition for jobs in the short-run – and to shift policymakers’ attention to the creation of good jobs at a global scale.

Last edited by JKP admin

Responses received to this post via Twitter:

Two response to this Wiki topic have been received from the JKP's Twitter audience. Twitter user​ @pukadjobs said cooperative policies and arrangements between different governments can reduce global competition for jobs, and @aypeq said cooperative policies and arrangements are reducing competition for jobs in Latin America, where the left are bandwagoning with each other.